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Étiquette : promotion

Tips to get the job title you deserve

ronald ventura, insight, career coaching, job title
Ronald VENTURA – Dogwars, 2013-2017 – Huile sur toile, 123 x 244 cm

 

Job titles are just labels. True. And sometimes labels help, facilitate, support achieve goals. Of course, they also please ego which shouldn’t be the main reason to negociate a change with your manager.

In an article published in Harvard Business Review, journalist Rebecca Knight highlights a few principles to keep in mind when you want to get the job title you think you deserve. 

Do:

  • Think about your individual circumstances and consider your reasons for wanting a new title. How will a new title help you do your job better?
  • Leverage your social network and other online resources to identify possible job titles that reflect your skills, expertise, and status.
  • Reflect on your boss’s motivations and challenges. Before you make the request, ask yourself: Why would my current or prospective boss say yes?

Don’t:

  • Go overboard with a personalized title. If you’d like one and your employer agrees to it, make sure you have a traditional equivalent.
  • Be myopic about negotiating for a better title. Everything — including your salary, job description, and benefits — should be on the table.
  • Get discouraged if you don’t get what you want right away. Asking for a new title is an ongoing negotiation.

 

Source: hbr.org

 

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Build your external reputation

serge poliakoff, composition, reputation
Serge POLIAKOFF – Composition, 1956 – Huile sur toile, 96.7 x 130.2 cm

 

According to Wharton management professor Matthew Bidwell, external hires are initially paid 18% to 20% more than the promoted workers. It also seems they have higher levels of experience and education and have higher exit rates. This would mean that a recruitment strategy based on seductive higher salaries is efficient to attract brains and does not generate loyalty.

On top of that, those newcomers get significantly lower performance evaluations for their first two years on the job than do their colleagues who are promoted into similar functions.

Consequently we could also conclude that professionals are often taken for granted by their own organizations. Not really motivating, isn’t it? From a more dynamic perspective, we would conclude that – whatever the career plan you may have – it is important to cultivate a strong external reputation so that you can leverage opportunities when you want.

 

 

Sources: knowledge.wharton.upenn.edu, journals.sagepub.com, hbr.org

 

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